Munich Christmas Market Poster Features Snowman In Islamic Burqa

Tollwood “Winter Festival” poster featuring snowman wearing a Muslim burqa. Image Source: Tollwood-Magazin
Tollwood “Winter Festival” poster featuring snowman wearing a Muslim burqa. Image Source: Tollwood-Magazin

A German Christmas Market has come under fire for printing an ad in its magazine featuring a snowman wearing a Muslim burqa and one in a hijab. As well as several other culturally dressed snowmen representing cultures that don’t typically celebrate Christmas.

The Tollwood “Winter Festival” poster appears to show a snowman in purple Islamic dress in the very center with its face almost entirely concealed by a veil. One is wearing a Saudi ghutra, and two others are wearing hijabs.

Tollwood “Winter Festival” poster featuring snowman wearing a Muslim burqa. Image Source: Tollwood-Magazin

Tollwood “Winter Festival” poster featuring snowman wearing a Muslim burqa. Image Source: Tollwood-Magazin

The German translates to “All of us.” [literally, “We, all.”] “Nov 26 to Dec 23, enclosed market in Theresienwiese, Munich”. There is no mention of Christmas (“Weihnachten”) anywhere in the ad.

It seems a bizarre choice for a Christmas market. Muslims typically do not celebrate Christmas, particularly in areas where women are required to cover themselves by law.

After being nominated for reelection last year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel called for a ban on the burqa “wherever legally possible”. Interior Minister Thomas de Maizière had previously proposed to make full-face veils illegal in public buildings in Germany.

A few months ago, the state of Bavaria — of which Munich is the capital — enacted a legal ban on Islamic face-covering veils for state workers, teachers and students.

Similarly in France, the burqa is banned in public places. When the French Senate approved the ban in 2010, they issued the statement: “Given the damage [the burqa] produces on those rules which allow the life in community, ensure the dignity of the person and equality between sexes, this practice, even if it is voluntary, cannot be tolerated in any public place.”

With this in mind, Voice of Europe questioned whether the oppression of women was a sensible marketing tool. Bavarian Chairman of the Region Petr Bystron wrote on Facebook, “A burqa snowman as a symbol of tolerance?” The post could well cost Facebook 50 million euros if they fail to take it down before January 1, 2018. The Alternative for Germany party (AfD) also condemned the advertisement.

Several companies across Western Europe have faced criticism for engaging in what appears to be a sustained assault on Christmas over the last few years. In what many view as an attempt to “secularize” the holiday, by removing or ignoring the religious Christian foundation of the holiday.

While some ascribe a more financial motivation to the changes than anti-Christian. By appealing to other religious groups, the numbers of those involved in the materialistic shopping frenzy becomes more profitable. British supermarket, Tesco, received a major online backlash for its television ad this month, which featured veiled Muslim women celebrating Christmas, but no Christian imagery whatsoever.

Many European Christmas markets have recently been rebranded as “Winter Market”, “Winter Ville” or “Winter Fun”. Christian symbols are also rapidly disappearing under the force of political correctness. A famous Christmas market in central Paris was mysteriously cancelled so that it could be “modernized”, causing huge riots last night.

Most European Christmas markets are now protected by concrete barriers and armed police.

Most European Christmas markets are now protected by concrete barriers and armed police.

Tucker J.

Tucker is a foreign correspondent and media analyst for Not Liberal.

About the Author

Tucker J.
Tucker J.
Tucker is a foreign correspondent and media analyst for Not Liberal.

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