Mattis Delivers First New National Defense Strategy in a Decade

Defense Secretary James N. Mattis announced the new National Defense Strategy in a speech at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, Jan. 19, 2018. Image Source: DoD graphic
Defense Secretary James N. Mattis announced the new National Defense Strategy in a speech at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, Jan. 19, 2018. Image Source: DoD graphic

DoD Official: Gen. Mattis Announces New National Defense Strategy To Rebuild Dominance, Enhance Deterrence

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19, 2018 – The National Defense Strategy — announced today is aimed at restoring America’s competitive military advantage to deter Russia and China from challenging the United States, its allies or seeking to overturn the international order that has served so well since the end of World War II. Secretary of Defense, James Mattis, explains:

It is the first new National Defense Strategy in a decade. The defense strategy builds on the administration’s National Security Strategy that President Donald J. Trump announced Dec. 18.

Elbridge A. Colby, deputy assistant secretary of defense for strategy and force development, briefed Pentagon reporters about the unclassified summary of the strategy in advance of Defense Secretary James N. Mattis unveiling the policy, saying “this is not a strategy of confrontation, but it is strategy that recognizes the reality of competition.”

The National Defense Strategy seeks to implement these pillars of the National Security Strategy:

  • Peace through strength,
  • The affirmation of America’s international role,
  • The U.S. alliance and partnership structure and
  • The necessity to build military advantage to maintain key regional balances of power.

Confronting Challenges

The strategy states that the primary challenge facing the Defense Department and the joint force is “the erosion of U.S. military advantage vis-a-vis China and Russia, which, if unaddressed, could ultimately undermine our ability to deter aggression and coercion and imperil the free and open order that we seek to underwrite with our alliance constellation,” Colby said.

The strategy aims at thwarting Chinese and Russian aggression and use of coercion and intimidation to advance their goals and harm U.S. interests, and specifically focuses on three key theaters: Europe, the Indo-Pacific and the Middle East, Colby said.

While Russia and China are the main U.S. adversaries in this strategy, DoD must address North Korea, Iran and the threat posed by terrorism.

Colby noted, and he said this strategy does that. “The strategy will have significant implications for how the department shapes the force, develops the force, postures the force, uses the force.”

More Lethal, Agile Force

The strategy looks to build a more lethal and agile force. It shifts away from the post-Desert Storm model, and DoD seeks to modernize key capabilities and innovate using new technologies and operational concepts to maintain dominance across all domains.

Finally, the strategy seeks to reform DoD to create a culture that “delivers cost-effective performance at the speed of relevance,” Colby said.

The new strategy is needed because China and Russia have “gone to school” studying the American way of war, he said. The U.S. dominance in the Middle East during Desert Strom was not lost on Russia or China. The two nations have spent the last 25 years studying ways to deny America its greatest military advantage, he said: the ability to deploy forces anywhere in the world and then sustain them.

The anti-access, area-denial methods that both Russia and China have developed need to be countered, and this new strategy sets in place the framework around which to build those capabilities.

Joint Force Should Be Ready

“The joint force should be ready to compete, to deter and — if necessary — to win against any adversary,” Colby concluded.

Modernization has been the sacrificial lamb in the recent budget wars. This strategy reemphasizes the importance of modernization, Pentagon officials said. The strategy specifically states the United States:

  • must modernize the nuclear triad.
  • Emphasizes the importance of space and cyberspace as domains of warfare and
  • Calls for resilience in both space and cyberspace capabilities, technology and concepts to operate across the full domains.

The strategy also calls for modernized command-and-control assets and for new intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. Adding that missile defense plays a large role in the strategy, as well as the development of advanced autonomous systems.

“I think if anybody knows Secretary Mattis or looks at his history, he’s not inclined to publish documents or give guidance that he doesn’t actually intend to execute,” Marine Corps Gen. Joe Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said during a recent interview in Brussels. “I can assure you that one of the things that gives me confidence the National Defense Strategy will affect our behavior is Secretary Mattis’ ownership of the National Defense Strategy, and his commitment to actually lead the U.S. military in a direction that is supportive of that National Defense Strategy.”

Source

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About the Author

Jon Britton
Author, Advocate, Blogger & Zombie Aficionado. Air Force veteran and jack of all trades, with a wide range of experience with many different cultures around the world as well as working alongside both CEOs and average Joes. "Writing was never a goal or even vaguely contemplated as a career choice, it just happened, an accidental discovery of a talent and a passion." A passion that has taken him in many directions from history to zombies to advocacy to News especially in this day and age of "Fake News" and "Alternative Facts." The Truth Is Out There!

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